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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
profiles chinese artist and dissident ai wei wei, whose work is on exhibit in the u.s. for the first time. >> if we can change ourselves, that means part of society will change. if more people can do so, then we can change the society. >> woodruff: and we look at what the federal trade commission calls a "digital danger zone," mobile applications that gather data about children. >> what needs to be done is a way for parents to easily at any time see exactly what's being collected and who they are sharing that information with. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: michigan, a s
to some useful resources on our website. we hope it can be of some help today in the wake of this devastating tragedy. we move now to tonight's discussion. and joining me on the panel are aarti kohli, senior fellow at uc berkeley's warren institute on war and social policy. paul rogers, environmental writer with the "san jose mercury news." stephen sock, investigative reporter with nbc bay area. and from los angeles, david lazarus, columnist with "the l.a. times." aurti, let's start with you. uc berkeley announced a new scholarship program for undocumented students. why did the university feel it was necessary to support these students? >> well, yes it's very excites news. $1 million from the foundation. and the university really feels strong obligation to these students because they're one of the most vulnerable set of students that we have. the average family income for these students is $24,000 a year. they're not eligible for federal financial aid. they're not eligible for pell grants. and so they've overcome great odds just to get to berkeley and we want to keep them
buster, a tactic used to delay legislation but republicans say the tool is key to protecting their minority rights. >> warner: on the eve of world aids day, ray suarez updates the hopes and frustrations in the fight against the deadly disease. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> warner: and is the grand canyon 60 million years older than we've long thought? we ask science correspondent miles o'brien. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and by bnsf railway. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: washington's clock ticked another day closer today to automatic tax hikes and spending cuts, the so-called "fiscal cliff". the president took to the road, while republicans warned there's a deadlock in efforts to reach a deficit deal. >> now, of course, santa delivers everywhere. i've b
these awful events. it helps those of us distanced from the loss to imagine to even grieve the emptiness of the homes and hearts of those who loved them. we will never forget. we mourn, move on, and too soon forget. then it will happen again some day. we'll scratch our heads and ask ourselves, was the last time newtown or columbine? was it aurora or that college in virginia? once again, we will mourn, move on, and too soon forget. there is an old saying that in remembrance is the secret of redemption. but america forgets quickly and gives no lasting indication it seems redemption from its fetish with guns, its romance with the free market of violence, with the sport of it all. the show must go on. it's our right. at any price. what were their names again? oh, yes. charlotte, daniel, olivia, daniel, allison, dawn. poor things. such a tragedy. praise the lord and pass the ammunition. so we make our peace with violence and make ourselves over in its image. a state senator in missouri, a lifetime member of the national rifle association, is pushing a bill to require that all first graders be
duchamps had done 50 years before. warhol popularized a lot of things that hadn't been popular, like using photography. there had been photography around in painting but very little. >> rose: so what was the reaction at his time when he was doing this, when he first did the campbell soup can and when he first did these things, did the portraiture and did -- >> he became hated immediately and he became unbelievably famous within just a couple of years one of the things that's fascinateing to me is a lot of the people who hated him were not artists and i love to say artists make art history and artists started being touched by warhol no matter what anybody was saying. >> then the curve -- >> larry bell, we have the quote from larry bell, who would expect this in 1963 or '64 saying "warhol's just changed everything." (laughs) rarery bell! >> rose: i forgot he died when he was only 58. >> that's right. far too young. >> rose: let's take a look at some of these. the first image is andy warhol self-portrait in 1967. when we see this, what made you include this and how do other people at this tab
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)